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clr for cleaning gas tank ?

  • 17 Oct 2010 10:47 PM
    Message # 445597
    Anonymous
    i just picked up an 88 honda shadow that had been badly neglected ,gas tank is rusty inside and i was wondering if anyone has tried C L R to clean the rust out of a tank .
  • 18 Oct 2010 8:09 AM
    Reply # 445754 on 445597
    Deleted user
    i cleaned one recently with 60% hydrochloric acid and some bbs. You could get all that in and strap it to the front of a little cement mixer and have it rotate for an hour or two...then rinse it with tons of water ...did the trick for me
  • 18 Oct 2010 8:35 AM
    Reply # 445759 on 445597
    I use Evaporust from Canadian Tire. It is slow but a lot more environmentally and paint friendly than a lot of the other methods.
  • 20 Nov 2010 9:42 AM
    Reply # 466690 on 445597
    Good point. I've used Evaporust for nearly all my rust removal projects. It's become so popular that I usually buy 3 or 4 containers at a time. Great product (and easy on the environment)!

    -Kevin
  • 21 Nov 2010 10:00 AM
    Reply # 467118 on 445597
    Anonymous
    hello melmeister.. i also recently made the same journey through rust city. and when all was said and done the best thing that worked for me was white vinegar and hot water, i tried metal rescue ( as seen on you tube.. great video but did not work as well as advertised, also $35/gallon and you need about 3 gallon as all the metal is supposed to be submerged .. while i was trying to locate por 15 , i refilled the tank with vinegar and hot water for the 4 days it took me to find the por 15.. and after i bought the por 15 i could not get a free day to use it for another 2 days.. by then the tank looked great so i returned the por15 and saved my self $60.. good luck.. nick (65 cb 77superhawk, and 64 dream and still no motorcycle license .. one day soon hopefully.... cheers nick
  • 25 Nov 2010 9:23 AM
    Reply # 469452 on 467118
    Nick Perna wrote: hello melmeister.. i also recently made the same journey through rust city. and when all was said and done the best thing that worked for me was white vinegar and hot water, i tried metal rescue ( as seen on you tube.. great video but did not work as well as advertised, also $35/gallon and you need about 3 gallon as all the metal is supposed to be submerged .. while i was trying to locate por 15 , i refilled the tank with vinegar and hot water for the 4 days it took me to find the por 15.. and after i bought the por 15 i could not get a free day to use it for another 2 days.. by then the tank looked great so i returned the por15 and saved my self $60.. good luck.. nick (65 cb 77superhawk, and 64 dream and still no motorcycle license .. one day soon hopefully.... cheers nick
    What ratio of vinegar to water did you use?
  • 30 Nov 2010 4:16 PM
    Reply # 471918 on 445597
    Electrolisis worked great for me. Used a 12 volt battery charger, old bolt, wire and washing soda. Lots of info on the net. Por-15 is a great product.
  • 16 Dec 2010 9:42 PM
    Reply # 481714 on 469452
    Ken (Administrator)
    Tony Boothman wrote:
    Nick Perna wrote: hello melmeister.. i also recently made the same journey through rust city. and when all was said and done the best thing that worked for me was white vinegar and hot water, i tried metal rescue ( as seen on you tube.. great video but did not work as well as advertised, also $35/gallon and you need about 3 gallon as all the metal is supposed to be submerged .. while i was trying to locate por 15 , i refilled the tank with vinegar and hot water for the 4 days it took me to find the por 15.. and after i bought the por 15 i could not get a free day to use it for another 2 days.. by then the tank looked great so i returned the por15 and saved my self $60.. good luck.. nick (65 cb 77superhawk, and 64 dream and still no motorcycle license .. one day soon hopefully.... cheers nick
    What ratio of vinegar to water did you use?

    I used "pickling" vinegar straight up on my GT500 tank that was VERY rusty. 4L and lots of shaking with two lengths of chain in the tank. Rinsed with hot water. Then a second application with 8L and the chain. Each time the vinegar was in the tank for 3 days. This worked well. (just finished today as a matter of fact) Removed all the rusty gunk. It will "flash rust" quickly though so I put about two litres of two stroke oil in and sloshed that around so all surfaces are coated. I will rinse it out before I use the tank. Advantage to pickling vinegar is that it is 7% acetic acid compared to 3 or 4 % for regular vinegar. Plus it won't hurt the paint and doesn't smell as bad as stronger acids.

    Yes I've used CLR as well on tanks that were more dirty than rusty with good results. BTW- lots of tank advise in the newsletter back earlier this year. Most recommend the POR15 product.


     

  • 17 Dec 2010 8:21 PM
    Reply # 482181 on 445597
    Dan

    I have recently removed the rust from 1 Norton Commando tank and 2 Honda CD175 tanks.  Visit a feed store and purchase a gallon of feed molasses ($4.95).  Pour it into the tank and top with hot water and shake.  Leave it in about 2 weeks.  At that point I added a handful of drywall screws and shook the tank for a few minutes. Drain and have a look.  I poured the solution back in for another week for the Norton tank which was very rusty.  Rinse thoroughly with water and then rinse with methyl hydrate (gas line antifreeze) to remove the water and then dry the tank with a hair dryer.  All three came out unbelievably clean and free of rust.  I did not seal the Commando tank and it is perfect after a full year of being in service.  Spray some WD40 into the tank if you are going to store it for a while.

     

    Now the chemistry…. Feed molasses has natural phosphoric acid in it and the molecules in the rest of the molasses have chelating agents. These are made of molecules that are shaped a bit like the claws of a crab--the word chelating comes directly from the Latin word chele, meaning claw. They can envelop metal atoms on the surface of an object, trapping them and removing them. Molasses owes its properties to cyclic hydroxamic acids which are powerful chelators of iron.

     

    Give it a try, I was skeptical when I first head about it – it is not harmful to the tank the way strong acids like muriatic (hydrochloric) acid is.  The solution has done three tanks so far as well as some rusty tools......


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