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Velorex brake

  • 24 Apr 2014 1:47 AM
    Message # 1542726
    I'm in the midst of attaching a 1982 Velorex 562 onto my 1984 Yamaha XS650. The Velorex came with a braked wheel so I bought the proper cable from VelorexUSA to connect it.
    Turns out the cable comes with the adjusting nut and pivot piece for the brake end but t'other end just has a hook swaged onto it, the rest being entirely the purchaser's problem.
    My solution was a separate pedal and some home-made parts.
    What amuses me is that on cleaning up the wheel & brake I found the Velorex brake shoes still have the manufacturer's logo printed on their working surfaces. In all those years and all those Previous Owners, I'm the first to bother with hooking up the brake.
  • 03 Jan 2017 6:51 PM
    Reply # 4505778 on 1542726

    I have a disc on the car but the rear Harley master cylinder isn't of enough capacity to handle two disc brakes. Your cable setup is better in my opinion. Ill have to provide an additional master cylinider.

    Having a brake on the sidecar really improves directional stability, under panic stops especially

    Doug

  • 07 Feb 2017 4:28 PM
    Reply # 4596570 on 1542726
    Tom

    Fred: I have a 74 Velorex that I attach to a 2005 Triumph Bonneville and have been advised by all to not use the sidecar brake.  

  • 22 Feb 2017 12:50 AM
    Reply # 4622760 on 4596570
    Tom Reid wrote:

    Fred: I have a 74 Velorex that I attach to a 2005 Triumph Bonneville and have been advised by all to not use the sidecar brake.  


    Hi Tom,

    better they should advise you to install the sidecar brake and be careful how you use it.

    Mine is operated by a separate pedal mounted adjacent to the rear brake pedal

    Toe in, operate rear brake, toe straight, operate both, toe out, operate sidecar brake only.

    And if you also get a ratcheting handbrake lever from a scrapyard you can rig it to lock the sidecar brake on to use as a parking brake.

  • 22 Feb 2017 1:03 AM
    Reply # 4622771 on 4505778
    Doug Smith wrote:

    I have a disc on the car but the rear Harley master cylinder isn't of enough capacity to handle two disc brakes. Your cable setup is better in my opinion. Ill have to provide an additional master cylinider.

    Having a brake on the sidecar really improves directional stability, under panic stops especially

    Doug


    Hi Doug,

    my XS11/S of A rig's sidecar has a hydraulic drum brake salvaged from an early Honda Civic. I was told that the easiest way to operate it was with a motorcycle rear hydraulic m/c, pedal and all, mounted backwards on the sidecar frame so it's pedal was next to the rear brake pedal. Because the car rear hub has mechanical as well as hydraulic applicators I was able to fit a car handbrake cable and ratchet to make a parking brake.  

  • 22 Feb 2017 9:32 PM
    Reply # 4627510 on 1542726

    I used hydraulic brakes on front wheel and chair wheel both hooked to the front lever with a double banjo at the master. you do need a reducer in the line to the chair wheel and speed shop sells the adjustable valve I believe max reduction about 40% of normal? once set you can forget it. some cars have a non adjustable valve in the line to rear brakes, but I could not get an answer from the Ford dealer as to what reduction they provided.

    My preference for the front brake is simply that its application alone brings the chair around the bike, hooking the two keeps it straight.

    This system worked fine, you need some flex line to avoid vibration fractures with a XS650 can't speak for other possibly smoother bikes. 

  • 23 Feb 2017 4:57 AM
    Reply # 4628086 on 1542726

    Very good advice for a  brake application. Lots of smart people on this forum. The weather is so mild I might play with my setup today....Doug

    Last modified: 23 Feb 2017 4:58 AM | Doug


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