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Mounting help for a Velorex 560 to a Puch 250

  • 10 Mar 2012 12:23 AM
    Message # 853265
    Deleted user
    Hi folks,

    I've got the hack and the bike - looking for tips or examples of installing a Puch 560 to a pressed frame bike like my Puch 250 - for more info take a look here http://nortonfastback.com/puch/250/?cat=29

    Many thanks,
    Phil
  • 13 Mar 2012 7:43 PM
    Reply # 857914 on 853265

    Phil,

    This sounds like a real interesting outfit! I've been exclusively sidecar for 12 or 13 years with only four days last year with a borrowed solo machine -(A great story by itself). I had a 175 Puch twingle in the early 60's and I think the extra torque and low center of gravity of the 250 might be particularly good for sidecar use. The frame should be stiff enough by itself to handle nicely without a sub frame. If I can be of any help with specifics just holler!-(I've figured a few things out along the way that that seem to work! - lol)

  • 09 Mar 2014 7:11 PM
    Reply # 1514022 on 853265

    I've got the hack and the bike - looking for tips or examples of installing a Puch 560 to a pressed frame bike like my Puch 250  -   -   -

    Hi Phil,
    sturdy as it might be, there's nowhere on the Puch 250's spine frame that's in the right place to hang a chair on.
    You'll need to make a subframe to go between the Puch's engine mount bolts or other suitable strongpoints and where the sidecar's mounting brackets have to attach.
    To see where these are type Velorex USA into your search engine and search the site for attachment instructions.
    I build subframes from flat plate and square tube because it's far easier to make tight fitting welding joints in that material than it is to make them in pipe or mechanical tube.
    You will need access to and the requisite skills (or friends who have same) to operate a welding machine, a drill press and a chopsaw. From my own experience, the second one builds real easy.
    Fred Hill, S'toon.


The Canadian Vintage Motorcycle Group (CVMG) is a not-for-profit organization aimed at promoting the use, restoration and interest in older motorcycles and those of historic interest.


The Canadian Vintage Motorcycle Group (CVMG) is a not-for-profit organization aimed at promoting the use, restoration and interest in older motorcycles and those of historic interest.

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